News

Run Up to Festival of Genomics: Angelman Syndrome – Michelle Krishnan

12 September 2019

Dr Michelle Krishnan, Translational Medicine Leader in Rare Diseases at Roche, will by speaking at our upcoming Festival of Genomics. Her talk Clinical Development in Rare Diseases: Angelman Syndrome, From Disease Biology Insights to Genomic Medicine, will explain how to leverage disease biology insights to drive development of genomic medicines and discuss the cutting-edge clinical trial […]

12 September 2019

HDRUK to Launch Seven New Data Research Hubs

Health Data Research UK (HDRUK) is launching pioneering data research centres to enable cutting-edge research and innovation to benefit UK patients  Seven new data hubs to be rolled out across the UK to speed up research for new medicines, treatments, and technologies that support quicker diagnoses and save lives  The hubs will use the latest […]

12 September 2019

Bacteria Can Become Resistant Even Without Antibiotic Use

Governments around the world are trying to heavily restrict antibiotic use in the hope that this will prevent the development of resistance which renders many medical treatments useless. However, new research demonstrates that bacterial resistance can spread regardless. Darwin’s theory of evolution tells us that if the selection pressure of antibiotics is applied to a […]

11 September 2019

UK Government Launches World’s Largest Genetics Project to Tackle Deadly Diseases

A new ground-breaking project in the fight against life-threatening illnesses has launched today. The £200 million whole genome sequencing project is being created, forming a partnership of pharmaceutical firms and health experts which will examine and sequence the genetic code of 500,000 volunteers at the UK Biobank, based in Stockport. Prime Minister Boris Johnson said: […]

11 September 2019

Insulin Delivery Drug Could Treat Deadly Brain Cancer

An existing drug used to improve insulin delivery could also be used to treat an aggressive and deadly brain tumour, known as glioblastoma. Glioblastoma (GBM) is a fast-growing tumour that spreads in a web like fashion to infiltrate multiple areas of the brain. As it is not a compact tumour, it is extremely difficult to […]

11 September 2019

Sticky Protein Key to Breast Cancer Metastasis

When cancer cells break off from their initial tumour they can spread throughout the body and invade other organs to form new tumours, in a process known as metastasis. Although metastatic tumours cause 90% of deaths in cancer patients, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. However, a new study revealed that the expression of […]

10 September 2019

Outbreak Proximity Sways Anti-Vaxxers

There has been a recent rise in measles outbreaks worldwide, despite it being an entirely preventable disease with an effective vaccination. Countries including the UK and Greece were recently stripped of their measles free status by the World Health Organisation for their failure to contain the outbreaks. The growing suspicion around the safety of vaccines […]

10 September 2019

Shareable Science: The Genetics of the Impossible Burger

We are delighted to introduce our new guest contributor Dr Neil Lamb, who’s Shareable Science blog will be a fortnightly feature on the website. Neil is the Vice President for Educational Outreach at the HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology and Shareable Science will explore how genetics is relevant to people in their everyday lives.  The Impossible […]

9 September 2019

Genetic Basis for Being Left Handed Identified

Being left-handed could be down to differences in brain architecture, a new study has shown. Only 10% of the population are left-handed, as has been the case for thousands of years, but previous studies have struggled to identify the reasons behind this. Using data from the UK Biobank, the genomes of 400,000 people, including 38,332 […]

9 September 2019

Has a DNA Study Solved the Mystery of the Loch Ness Monster?

Mysterious sightings of a giant creature in the lake have fascinated Loch Ness visitors for years. The fabled Lock Ness monster, or ‘Nessie’, has been speculated to be a prehistoric marine reptile, called a plesiosaurus, or a shark. However, a recent DNA study could shed some light on one of Scotland’s longest running legends. Scientists […]

6 September 2019

Single-Sex Shrimp: A Sustainable Food Source Protected from Disease

In a study last week researchers at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev have highlighted how the development of mono-sex prawns could increase the aquaculture yield whilst reducing the spread of the second most devasting parasitic disease: schistosomiasis. Additionally, in a triple whammy the sterility of a single-sex population negates the ecological risk of the crustacean […]

4 September 2019

Queering the Genome – Are We Ready?

It has been less than a week since the landmark study into the genetics of same-sex sexual behaviour first broke and sparked debate across the twitterverse. There has been much disagreement amongst the scientific and LGBTQ+ communities alike, regarding whether this research should have been conducted at all. Conversely, many have praised the study for […]

3 September 2019

Gene That Promotes Natural Short Sleep Identified

The gene that controls how much sleep a person needs to feel fully rested has been identified by researchers. Back in 2009 the researchers led by Ying-Hui Fu, PhD, discovered that those with a mutation in their DEC2 gene averaged 6.25 hours sleep per night, compared to 8.06 hours in those without the mutation. 10 […]

3 September 2019

Data-Driven Drug Development – Early Bird for D4 Europe Expires This Week

The early bird rate for our next event D4 (Data-Driven Drug Development) Europe expires this Friday, the only event where attendees will receive data, evidence and case studies from the world’s leading minds in pharma. This meeting is designed specifically to cater for senior people in pharma, combining strategic insights of value to IT/R&D leaders, […]

3 September 2019

Advances in Improving HDR Efficiency for CRISPR Experiments

Despite vast progress in leveraging the CRISPR-Cas9 system for genome manipulation, bottlenecks still remain. Overcoming these bottlenecks is critical to ensure the efficacy of this technology in a clinical context. Several engineering approaches involve inducing a double -stranded break (DSB) to introduce new mutations, which are then repaired by the endogenous cellular machinery. The two […]