Reports

Defective DNA Repair Leads to Genome “Chaos”

Scientists have found a cause for the frequent and damaging events in cancer cells’ genetic material where sections of individual chromosomes were broken at a number of points and reassembled wrongly, so entire sections were missing and others were duplicated or incorporated in a wrong orientation.

Mutations in “Guardian of the Genome” Assist Cancer in Spreading

Tumours are helped in their development by mutating the most important cancer-prevention gene, p53, scientists from Melbourne have found. The study, published in Genes and Development, found that mutant p53 prevents the regular p53 protein from activating its natural defences, increasing the risk of the cancer spreading.

AMP 2018: Supporting Cancer Sufferers With the Mesothelioma Cancer Alliance

Given that Front Line Genomics was started after its founder’s father was diagnosed with Mesothelioma, it’s naturally a cause that we care passionately about. To that end we sat down with the Mesothelioma Cancer Alliance (MCA), an organisation dedicated to providing resources, information, and support to individuals suffering from mesothelioma and other asbestos-related diseases and their families, to find out more about the great work they do and the challenges they face every day. 

Cancer “Kill Code” Could be Naturally Embedded in Every Cell

Every single cell in the human body could contain a cancer “kill code” set to destroy cells which become cancerous, a new study reported in Nature Communications. The study, conducted by Northwestern University in the US, found that cancer cannot become resistant to this code, making it a potentially incredibly effective treatment.

Blocking MDSC immune cells shown to slow TNBC metastasis

A new report from the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine has expanded what we know about the connection between myeloid-derived immunosuppressor cells (MDSCs) and aggressive disease. Their research has found that blocking the deltaNp63 protein on tumour cells which directs MDSCs to tumour and metastatic sites, or blocking the MDSCs themselves, reduces tumour growth and metastasis in a mouse model of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC).