Clinical genomics

Efficiently translating genomic research into the clinic is one of the most important steps in the development of the field. The clinic is where we will see things come to fruition.

Digital DNA: Genetic Counselling – An Interview with Jill Davies

The Digital DNA series explores the role of large-scale genetic testing in science, industry and society. We aim to understand both the benefits and risks of this emerging technology and see what the future may hold. We talked to Jill Davies, CEO of GeneMatters. The company provides genetic counselling to patients through a telehealth platform […]

New Technique to Select Offspring Gender

A reversible chemical technique can separate sperm carrying X chromosomes from sperm carrying Y chromosomes to select the offspring sex of mice. Cells from male mammals contain both an X and Y chromosome. However, sperm cells contain either an X or Y chromosome. As the female egg cell always contains an X chromosome, sperm that […]

World Metastasis Summit 2019 Launch

When cancer cells break off from their initial tumour they can spread throughout the body and invade other organs to form new tumours, in a process known as metastasis. Metastatic tumours cause patients to develop stage IV or advanced cancer and are responsible for over 90% of deaths in cancer patients. In the past, cancer […]

New Blood Test Can Predict Cancer Progression

A new technique to analyse the tumour DNA present in patient’s blood circulations is an effective method to monitor breast cancer progression. The technique has been shown to give a hundred-fold improvement in the detection limit for tumour DNA. Analysis of the DNA that the tumour sheds into the bloodstream provides a non-invasive means of […]

Gene Discovery Explains Failure of Alzheimer’s Drugs

A gene discovery has explained why current Alzheimer’s drugs don’t work for lots of patients, and why so many new drugs fail in clinical trials. The acetylcholine receptor α7nAChR has long been a target of interest for Alzheimer’s drugs. The neurotransmitter acetylcholine is involved in memory and learning processes. Despite acetylcholine being linked to the […]

Genetic Similarities of Rare Bone Cancer Between Children and Dogs

A rare and difficult to cure bone cancer in children has been found to have significant genetic similarities with the same type of cancer in dogs. This insight could improve understanding of the disease and lead the development of more effective treatments. Osteosarcoma (OS) is a rare bone cancer in children, but relatively common in […]

Changes to Genetic Risk Factors Not Always Reported to Patients

Patients are not being informed about changes to their genetic risk factors for cancer, a new study shows. If an individual has a family history of a type of cancer, they can get a genetic test to identify their own cancer risk. Identifying a genetic risk means that person can get regular check-ups and be […]

Genetic Test Reduces Risk of Chemotherapy Side-Effects

A new genetic test has been successfully trialled at a hospital in Oxford to help doctors identify patients most at risk of chemotherapy side-effects.  Capecitabine and fluorouracil (5FU) are common chemotherapy drugs for cancers including breast, bowl and stomach. Both drugs act as anti-metabolites and resemble biological molecules found inside cells. When the drug molecules […]

BIO 2019 – An Interview with Irene Rombel, Senior Director and Head of Strategic Analysis at Janssen

With the recent conclusion of the Biotechnology Innovation Organization’s BIO 2019 event, we thought we’d talk to some of the fascinating individuals who were present to showcase their innovative ideas or technologies. Irene Rombel, Senior Director, Head of Strategic Analysis – External Innovation, Discovery, Product Development & Supply, at Janssen Research & Development, spoke at BIO 2019 about gene therapy and the next generation of biotherapeutics. We spoke to her about her thoughts on the gene therapy field, and the future for companies in that space.

George Church’s Startup Testing Pig Organs in Primates

eGenesis has announced that it is now testing pig organs on primates to see if they safe for human use. If successful, this practice could solve the current shortage of human organs for transplantation. The company has declared that the pig organs are the most highly engineered ever created by surgeons.

New “Jumping Gene” CRISPR Directly Inserts DNA

A new experimental version of CRISPR could help fix genes rather than disable them using transposons, or “jumping genes”. This could help move the current “find and delete” purpose of CRISPR to the more useful “find and replace” one.