Clinical genomics

Efficiently translating genomic research into the clinic is one of the most important steps in the development of the field. The clinic is where we will see things come to fruition.

First Common Risk Genes for Autism Discovered

Researchers from the Broad Institute in the US and Danish iPSYCH project have discovered the first common genetic risk variants for autism and uncovered genetic differences in clinical subgroups of autism.

How to Recruit a High-Performing Apprentice: Anglia Ruskin Panel Event

In September 2019, Anglia Ruskin University’s (ARU’s) Cambridge campus will begin the first year of its new – and currently unique in the UK – Data Scientist Degree Apprenticeship for the bioinformatics profession. Ahead of this, ARU and the Wellcome Sanger Institute have set up a “Lunch and Learn” panel event for hiring managers and talent acquisition specialists, looking at how they can best recruit and support top apprentices.

Bio-Rad’s PCR-Based Test for CML Finds FDA Approval

Global life science researcher Bio-Rad has announced that its droplet digital PCR-based test for chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML), the first of its kind, has been cleared by the FDA. The test quantifies BCR-ABL, the gene fusion which causes CML, in the blood.

USA Heads Genomics Salary Scale While UK Trails Well Behind

Genomics industry professionals working in the USA are the highest paid in the world and their UK colleagues earn on average less than half as much. This was one of the most striking findings from the second annual Genomics Industry Workforce survey report published this week by Front Line Genomics and Paramount Recruitment.

Chinese Institute Clones Gene-Edited Monkeys for Testing

Scientists at the Institute of Neuroscience (ION) in China have reportedly used gene-editing technology to disable a certain gene vital to sleep-cycle in macaque monkeys. This prototype could create populations of genetically identical monkeys to allow scientists to better study the mechanisms of complex human disorders.

Gene Drives Found to Work in Mice for First Time

Scientists working at the University of California have developed a form of gene drive to control the inheritance of multiple genes in mice. Until now, such technology has been limited to the control of inheritance in insects only.