CRISPR

New “Allelic” Gene Drive Replaces Faulty Genes with Preferred Versions

Scientists at the University of California San Diego have created a new version of a gene drive which could lead to spreading specific, favourably genetic variants through a population. This “allelic drive” uses a guide RNA to direct CRISPR to cut undesired gene variants and replace them with better versions of the gene.

“Shredder” CRISPR Technique Goes Beyond Normal Snipping Mechanism

An international team of scientists has developed a new gene editing tool which goes beyond the usual mechanisms of CRISPR, acting instead as a “shredder” which can delete large stretches of DNA with programmable targeting. The technology was also shown to work in human cells for the first time.

Gene Drives Found to Work in Mice for First Time

Scientists working at the University of California have developed a form of gene drive to control the inheritance of multiple genes in mice. Until now, such technology has been limited to the control of inheritance in insects only.

Festival of Genomics 2019 – The State of Genomics Today

The introduction of multi-omic research, the advancement of AI and machine learning to improve nearly every aspect of sequencing and data analysis, are just some of the big changes that will only become more prevalent in the future. We spoke to Angela Douglas MBE, Scientific Director of Genetics Laboratories at Liverpool Women’s Hospital, for her opinions on the changing nature of genomics and the trends to watch out for.

Festival of Genomics 2019 – Festival Highlights

With so many talks and panels occurring across our four stages and Live Lounge, we understand that it can be pretty hard to pick out the most unmissable discussions at the festival this year. Given the conundrum, we thought we’d help out! We’ve selected a couple of talks and panels occurring across the two days which we think will be incredibly interesting and enormously informative for a whole range of people.

“Switch Mechanism” in CRISPR Could Prevent Unwanted Side Effects

A new study published in Cell magazine and co-authored by CRISPR pioneer Jennifer Doudna has suggested a potential solution to the unwanted side-effects of using CRISPR in the body. The study details using a “switch” mechanism which could keep the Cas9 enzyme turned off until it reaches its target site.

No-Incision CRISPR Reduces Genetic Obesity in Mice

A modified version of CRISPR has been used to reverse genetic obesity in two different mouse models without editing any genes. The technique uses the guidance system in CRISPR to target certain genetic sequences and amplifies existing gene activity to ramp up protein production.

CRISPR Babies Could Face Unintended Consequences of Editing

The CCR5 gene has been researched by scientists since the 1990s, and has a number of roles which have not yet properly been uncovered. Loss of the gene’s function is known, however, to increase the risk of potentially fatal reactions to some diseases, and has shown an ability to enhance learning in mice.