Drug development

Genomics has the potential to significantly improve the efficacy of drugs and develop targeted therapies.

“Trojan Horse” Antibody to Treat Cancers Reaches New Test Stage

Toxic antibody tisutumab vedotin (TV) has shown promise as a treatment for a number of types of advanced cancer. This “trojan horse” approach has now reached the stage of being tested on a wider variety of patients. Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust researchers tested the drug on 147 patients to evaluate potential benefits and side effects.

J&J is First Pharma Giant to Advertise Drug Prices on TV

Johnson and Johnson has vowed to become the first pharmaceutical giant to add its medicine prices to television adverts, starting in March 2018. The company said it will list not only product price before rebates or discounts, as well as potential out-of-pocket costs which patients will pay.

Festival of Genomics 2019 – Festival Highlights

With so many talks and panels occurring across our four stages and Live Lounge, we understand that it can be pretty hard to pick out the most unmissable discussions at the festival this year. Given the conundrum, we thought we’d help out! We’ve selected a couple of talks and panels occurring across the two days which we think will be incredibly interesting and enormously informative for a whole range of people.

Hepatitis Drug Could Help Delay Progress of ALS

Telbivudine, a drug currently in use for treating patients with hepatitis, could be of use in significantly slowing the progression of Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), scientists from the University of Alberta have announced.

CEPI Provides $8.4 Million Grant to Fight “Disease X”

A new deal created by the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI) will use $8.4m to facilitate development of a vaccine platform to fight unknown pathogens. Under the deal, Imperial College London will work to create a self-amplifying RNA vaccine platform, which can then be made to rapidly develop anti-pathogen vaccines.

Blocking One Gene Could Cure Obesity

Scientists in South Australia have announced in the EMBO Reports journal that they may have found a single gene which can be blocked to promote weight loss without the need for diets or gym time.

Alzheimer’s-Linked Gene Could be Re-shuffling its Own DNA

APP, the gene responsible for making beta-amyloid in the brain, may be able to reshuffle its own DNA, scientists from Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute in California have claimed. This development could explain why most drugs to treat Alzheimer’s, which are designed to remove beta-amyloid protein build-ups in the brain, have proven ineffective in clinical trials.