Reports

Altering the genome, typically to better understand gene and protein function. This also paves the way for gene therapy.

CRISPR Babies Could Face Unintended Consequences of Editing

The CCR5 gene has been researched by scientists since the 1990s, and has a number of roles which have not yet properly been uncovered. Loss of the gene’s function is known, however, to increase the risk of potentially fatal reactions to some diseases, and has shown an ability to enhance learning in mice.

WHO to Create Gene Editing Expert Panel

The World Health Organization is establishing an expert panel to set guidelines and standards on the ethical and safety issues of gene editing, the body has announced. This follows the recent revelation that a scientist in China claimed he had edited the genes of twin babies to make them HIV resistant.

New Study Details CRISPR to Molecular Level

A new study by the the Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Protein Research details how CRISPR-Cas12a works, right down to the molecular level. This should make it possible to fine-tune the process to achieve better results.

CRISPR-Edited Twins Allegedly Born in China

Twin girls in China have allegedly been born after having their embryonic genetic code modified using CRISPR. Chinese researcher He Jiankui, from the Southern University of Science and Technology, claims to have turned off a gene called CCR5 to offer total protection against HIV, as well as smallpox and cholera.

CRISPR Repairs DNA Even Without Donor Template

CRISPR-Cas9 can carry out precise genome editing even without the assistance of donor DNA templates, a team of scientists from Brigham and Women’s Hospital and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard have found.

Gene Editing Could Cure Fatal Muscle Disease

The editing of muscle cells in young beagles, bred to Duchenne muscular dystrophy, to remove a key barrier to higher protein production could greatly further the treatment of the disease in humans.

Stem Cells and Gene Editing Create Mice From Two Mothers

Researchers at the Chinese Academy of Sciences have used two female mice to create offspring which subsequently went on to have healthy children of their own. While similar offspring were produced from two male mice, they did not survive for longer than a few days.