Reports

Oncology is the most advanced area in genomics right now. The field is setting the standard for other indications to follow and improve upon.

Reprogrammed Skin Cells Shrink Mouse Tumours

Personalised tumour-detecting cells from adult skin cells have been used to shrink brain tumours in mice by up to 5%, scientists have revealed. While the strategy has not yet been fully tested in people, it could in the future give doctors the ability to develop a custom treatment for certain cancer types.

CRUK and AstraZeneca to Launch New Genomics Centre in UK

AstraZeneca and Cancer Research UK (CRUK) have announced that they will work together to open a new research centre in the UK, applying CRISPR and other functional genomics technologies to develop new cancer drugs. Specifically, the centre will study how genes and proteins interact with each other in cancer cells, and create disease models using genome-altering technologies based on this.

Scientists Create Ten-Minute Universal Test for Cancer

A universal test which can detect traces of any cancer in a patient’s bloodstream in ten minutes has been developed by scientists from the University of Queensland. As it stands the test has a sensitivity of 90%, so is able to detect 90 in 100 cases of cancer.

Defective DNA Repair Leads to Genome “Chaos”

Scientists have found a cause for the frequent and damaging events in cancer cells’ genetic material where sections of individual chromosomes were broken at a number of points and reassembled wrongly, so entire sections were missing and others were duplicated or incorporated in a wrong orientation.

New Tech Predicts Biosequence Binding in Seconds

A new technology known as “Pattern to Knowledge” (P2K) has been created by researchers at the University of Waterloo to predict the binding of biosequences in only seconds. The new development could radically speed up discovery of new drugs and reduce the need for expensive laboratory tests.

Mutations in “Guardian of the Genome” Assist Cancer in Spreading

Tumours are helped in their development by mutating the most important cancer-prevention gene, p53, scientists from Melbourne have found. The study, published in Genes and Development, found that mutant p53 prevents the regular p53 protein from activating its natural defences, increasing the risk of the cancer spreading.