Reports

New Study Details CRISPR to Molecular Level

A new study by the the Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Protein Research details how CRISPR-Cas12a works, right down to the molecular level. This should make it possible to fine-tune the process to achieve better results.

CRISPR Repairs DNA Even Without Donor Template

CRISPR-Cas9 can carry out precise genome editing even without the assistance of donor DNA templates, a team of scientists from Brigham and Women’s Hospital and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard have found.

New Tech Predicts Biosequence Binding in Seconds

A new technology known as “Pattern to Knowledge” (P2K) has been created by researchers at the University of Waterloo to predict the binding of biosequences in only seconds. The new development could radically speed up discovery of new drugs and reduce the need for expensive laboratory tests.

Tiny Bio-Scaffold Could Perfect Stem Cell Transportation

A minuscule, biodegradable scaffold has been created to transplant stem cells and deliver drugs within the body, the Nature Communications journal has reported, which could help with treatments for Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases, as well as aging brain degeneration and spinal cord injuries.

Illumina Buys PacBio for $1.2bn

DNA sequencing company Pacific Biosciences (PacBio) is being bought for $1.2bn by bigger rival Illumina, it was announced yesterday. The deal represents a 71% premium on yesterday’s closing price for PacBio, and is the largest that Illumina has ever made.

AMP 2018: The Challenges of Introducing NGS to Clinics Globally

We spoke to Dr. Carlos Prada, Assistant Professor of Clinical Genetics at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center within the University of Cincinnati Department of Pediatrics, and Dr. Emma Clement, Consultant in Clinical Genetics at Great Ormond Street Hospital in the UK, to find out how more about the challenges of implementing NGS globally, and where that implementation has been successful.

Scientists Uncover Why Some Cancers Affect Only Young Women

Cells settling in an organ other than the correct one during embryogenesis are often the cause of rare ovarian and pancreatic cancers which affect only young women, researchers at the University of Geneva (UNIGE) and the University Hospitals of Geneva (HUG) have found.